Archive

Author Archive

Can Web Advertising Last?

March 5, 2008 Leave a comment

While hunting for something wonderful to blog about I came across an article on the BBC Web site that caught my interest. The column discusses whether advertising has a real future on the Internet.

I for one think advertising has a very strong future on the Web and possibly in software. I think my generation is heavily to blame. I happen to be a product of Generation Y, which seems to be more commonly referred to as the “Millenials” these days. However you choose to refer to us, a very large number of us have somehow gotten the idea that things should be free. I’m not really sure where this belief came from, but it sure isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

We’ll throw down thousands of dollars for a computer, but we don’t want to pay for the media or software that goes on it. It’s pretty apparent that this applies to media more so than anything else. If we care to read news sites, such as the New York Times, we don’t want to pay extra for archived material. So what’s a publisher to do? In more and more cases, the answer seems to be advertising.

Advertising probably can’t work in all cases and it can be tricky to include it without being too intrusive, but it looks to be a popular solution. When the New York Times canceled its paid TimesSelect service a few months ago it integrated the content into the rest of the site and added ads to compensate (you still need a free account to access it). Even the BBC advertises on its international site these days to account for people outside of the U.K. who aren’t paying a license fee.

Maybe Napster is to blame, but the Millenials have been getting so much content for free that it’s going to be incredibly difficult to justify a higher price (if at all possible). With advertisers strongly interested in my generation and content providers struggling to make a buck they’ve begun to found some ground to work together. No, advertising on the Web definitely won’t be going anywhere anytime soon.

Source: BBC News – “The writing is on the wall for ads”

Advertisements

The Dot.com Bubble… 2.0?

December 5, 2007 Leave a comment

I came across this video yesterday during my daily check of Digg. It’s about the speculation of a Web 2.0 bubble and it’s to the tune of Billy Joel’s, “We Didn’t Start the Fire.”

The video even asked me to blog the song… how could I deny that?

The Digg Effect

November 22, 2007 Leave a comment

Social news aggregate Digg is well-known for its ability to drive traffic to unlikely, and sometimes likely, Web sites and blogs. The surges in traffic from popular posts often result in overloaded servers or hit bandwidth caps in a phenomenon dubbed the “Digg effect.”

Ben Cook, a curious blogger who runs Blogging Experiment, wondered whether the Digg effect could leave enough lasting effect for a blog to rely on for its foreseeable future. Basically, how much traffic would he continue to receive once the surge in visitors from a Digg post had dwindled away? Ben created a blog called Hilarious Names back in May and posted the first article to Digg to see what kind of results he would get.

Well, after receiving about 20,000 visitors within a few hours, things died down to about 1,000 a day and then to 10 a day. He decided to take a look at the blog’s stats again recently and found that it still receives 40-50 visitors a day and is the top result of over 2,000,000 in a Google query for “hilarious names.” Seventy-five percent of Hilarious Names’ traffic comes from search engines and 19% is from the Digg post. He concedes that 40-50 visitors a day isn’t that big of a deal, but it is kind of impressive considering that this traffic comes six months after his post on Digg and the only effort he put into the blog was posting two articles.

As an avid Digg user (a “Digg addict,” if you will) I’m intrigued. It makes sense, but like the people before Ben Cook, I never really thought about how much traffic a blog could be left with once the Digg effect had waned. Digg really holds a lot more potential than many people give it credit for.

Source: Blogging Experiment – The Lasting Digg Effect

Let’s Talk

November 21, 2007 Leave a comment

This is news that makes my day. A new study shows that just 10 minutes of social interaction everyday boosts performance of memory and test scores. Unsurprisingly, the more social interaction one had resulted in better cognition.

Crossword puzzles may now cower in fear as the findings also suggest that these social interactions may be just as beneficial as partaking in more “intellectual” activities, such as crossword puzzles. So, who’s up for a chat?

Source: US News & World Report

Google Growth

November 21, 2007 Leave a comment

Google has been at the top of the search engine game for years and new data from Hitwise shows that it’s only getting more popular. The search engine that spawned “googling” as an acceptable verb is now used for nearly 65% of all Web searches in the US.

Hitwise Search Engine Marketshare - Oct 2007

Usage of Google went up almost 6% last month compared to a year ago. Of the next three most popular search engines, Yahoo! Search, MSN Search, and Ask.com, Ask was the only one to see its numbers rise. It’s quite impressive to see Google grow an already commanding lead. Yahoo! Search took second place with 21.65% of searches in the US. That’s only a third of the queries Google handled!

I’d actually be a bit curious to see how many users rely on more than one search engine for typical use since it seems they tend to be pretty loyal to their favorite. I guess I’ll just have to google it to find out… (hah hah).